“Peace has to be created, in order to be maintained. It is the product of Faith, Strength, Energy, Will, Sympathy, Justice, Imagination, and the triumph of principle. It will never be achieved by passivity and quietism.” Dorothy Thompson

“Peace is not the absence of conflict but the presence of creative alternatives for responding to conflict — alternatives to passive or aggressive responses, alternatives to violence.” Dorothy Thompson

“True peace is not merely the absence of tension: it is the presence of justice.” Martin Luther King, jr

“Bad s**t makes good fertilizer.” By yours truly!

“Often on the battlefields, at the very moment when the armies approach each other with swords raised and lances thrust forwards, these bards will advance into the midst of their adversaries and tame them, as though having cast a spell over wild beasts.” Diodorous Siculus

Imagine a war between two noble Celtic tribes, standing on opposite sides of a valley shouting and raging at each other, waving big shiny implements in the air and wearing outlandish body paint and little else. From a nearby woodland, in the valley, steps a group of unarmed people dressed in white robes and carrying strong staffs. They are Druids, come to bring peace to the warring tribes.  The most senior amongst them ceremoniously raises her arms, with staff in hand, and proclaims at the top of her lungs “Oi, you lot PACK IT IN! Right, I want your bosses to get down here right now! I don’t care if this takes the rest of the century, we’re going to sort this out once and for all, got it?! We’ve got serious talking to do that’ll make your sword wielding antics look like an after-dinner toothpick wielding session!”

There is a difference between conflict and violence; violence is incompatible with peace, conflict is not. Violence is useless and destructive, conflict is potentially creative. Violence is smashing two heads together like pumpkins, conflict is more like two stones being struck together to make a spark; in a word, friction.

Conflict (friction) is energy. Energy cannot be created or destroyed, we can only redirect it. Conflict is an everyday and unavoidable part of our lives, therefore we cannot avoid it. If we do avoid or ignore that energy and don’t express it, it will invert itself, build up and explode, probably hurting someone that doesn’t deserve it (been there, done that). Or sometimes it implodes, which is where people hurt themselves (almost been there too).

So there’s no way around it, unresolved conflict becomes violence, externally or internally.  You can sugar coat it and avoid conflict in the name of “peace and serenity,” which only helps to reinforce (even create!) the problem of violence, not resolve it. But if any conflict in life is treated as spark-producing friction, then that “spark” can be used to start creative “fires” that can Inspire, Heal and Transform.

This concept of Inspiration, Healing and Transformation I derived from the roles of the Celtic fire goddess Brigit; as a patroness of poets her fire inspires, as a patroness of healers her fire heats the cauldron that brews the herbs that heal, and as a patroness of blacksmiths her fire melts the raw material that is transformed. Conflict, I believe, can be directed to light fires that Inspire, Heal and Transform, and many peacemakers (Druids and non-Druids alike) would do well to remember that peace is not the “absence of conflict” but an active endeavor, requiring effort.

We should strive not to respond to conflict with violence, but also we should not ignore or deny any conflict its necessary expression. As a Druid-in-training my work is to learn how to face and creatively deal with conflict, not in bullet riddled warzones, but in the personal relationships of everyday life.

 It’s hard work. It’s difficult to maintain. But ultimately, it’s rewarding.

Peace! (but let’s work on it)

Advertisements

“War does not determine who is right – only who is left.” Bertrand Russell

“A great war leaves the country with three armies – an army of cripples, an army of mourners, and an army of thieves.” German Proverb

“There is something ineluctably male about coalitional aggression – men bonding with men to engage in aggression against other men.” Rose McDermott

“Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.” Ernest Hemingway

“In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.” José Narosky

“To kill a man is not to defend a doctrine, but to kill a man.” Michael Servetus

There were so many quotes to choose from I could do nothing except leave this; http://www.quotegarden.com/war.html

This blog’s a bit more personal than some, but at the same time it’s all to do with a universal theme, something that many people can and do recognise. When I was a child, I played “war games” with friends, we’d pretend we were soldiers or fighter pilots and we’d be fighting against each other, running around the school playground, “shooting” each other. We thought it was “cool” and we sensationalise war, thinking it was “cool” and somehow “fun.” Another friend of mine didn’t want to play because he felt it was wrong, his granddad fought in World War II. I just thought “but it’s not real war,” and “my granddad was in the army too. So what?” Well, as I reveled in the “fun” of it all I told my granddad, something along the lines of, “You were in the army right? With tanks and guns and stuff. Wow, cool!”

My granddad was a stretcher bearer in WWII serving with the Gordon Highlanders. He was too old to take part in the fighting but young enough to go out to war and help in some way. This means he saw some of the worst parts of war, all of what comes after the killing. He saw dead people, dying people, insane people and other things that don’t need to be gone into, you can probably imagine. He even took a bit of shrapnel in his leg that he had embedded in him for the rest of his life. But I don’t know exactly what he saw, because he never spoke of his war experiences to anyone. No, not because it was so gobsmackingly “cool” and “fun”, very much the opposite! The psychological trauma of his experience made him shut up about it, as has happened with many others that have experiences war first hand. Unsurprisingly he didn’t want to relive the experience nor allow anyone else to be exposed to it.

But that didn’t help me much, at least not back then. I can’t imagine what was going through his head when an innocent little know-nothing-about-war boy, his own grandson, used words like “cool” and “fun” alongside war. And he didn’t even react! He sat in his chair silently not even able to bring himself to set me straight, just to talk to me and share a little bit of his wisdom. But now I’m older, and hopefully wiser, his silence has more of an impact on me than if he’d said anything. No pleasant reasoning, no angry shouting, not even an ashamed or mournful tear. His inability to speak speaks volumes that I can only understand now in my adulthood.

Recently I cried. I was watching a film that was showing some of the results of war. It showed inexperienced nurses being faced with all sorts of injuries, and one of them hid herself away to cry. It included old historical footage of soldiers waiting by a train, smiling at the camaraderie of it all, but completely ignorant about what will happen. Some of them just spotty boys that won’t even pull their trigger once before they’re shot. I imagined my granddad there with them, and I cried. His silent lesson really hit me then. I cried for him and the lesson of his hidden suffering behind his silence and for other people with less innocent experiences of war.

What I understand is that, when all is said and done, war is not about winners or losers, attack or defense, proud patriotic duty, little boys and their real or imagined toy guns, nor the sensationalisation of war and guns that is so prevalent in the media. At one end of the scale, if no one had fought the Nazi’s we’d be looking at a Nazi world. At the other, no matter how we may “justifiy” it or think it “necessary” war happens because all other options have failed. And here I must repeat Ernest Hemingway’s quote, “Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.”

Ultimately it’s about death and suffering. It’s about innocent youths getting killed before they’ve lived, it’s about never seeing friends and family ever again and it’s about seeing people so physically or psychologically damaged they’re never fully human again. Maybe if war was seen along these lines we’d try harder to find other, more creative, solutions to resolving conflictive situations, instead of sending soldeirs to kill or be killed. As Dorothy Thompson says about Peace; “Peace is not the absence of conflict but the presence of creative alternatives for responding to conflict — alternatives to passive or aggressive responses, alternatives to violence.”

I felt bad for what I’d said as a kid, but more importantly I have learnt better since then.