“The highest function of education is to bring about an integrated individual who is capable of dealing with life as a whole.” Krishnamurti

 

“Only the development of his inner powers can offset the dangers inherent in man’s losing control of the tremendous natural forces at his disposal and becoming the victim of his own achievements.” Roberto Assagioli

 

“I am beginning to suspect all elaborate and special systems of education. They seem to me to be built up on the supposition that every child is a kind of idiot who must be taught to think.” Anne Sullivan

 

Druids were educators. They had schools that taught many things; history, genealogy, stories, laws, lore and other things. They were living breathing archives that could be called upon by tribal chiefs and kings, or the common people of the tribes. They must have had complex mnemonic systems to catalogue everything into their memory, since their tradition was an oral one and it was forbidden to write anything down. One such system is their alphabet, the Ogham, that was used to list things and their attributes. The most well known is the tree alphabet, but there was plenty of others for birds, animals, herbs etc. This system, or one like it, must have been used to remember extensive information.

 

Druids today don’t have to be living breathing archives, we have books and computers for that sort of thing, and it is not forbidden to write anything down. A shame in some ways, as writing things down (like I am now) has the tendency to abstract information, removing it from living experience. And we can see that in the book-based education of today, it emphasises a lot on intellectual knowledge; what to think than on how to think. I don’t say that we should ban books (I love them too much!) but that they are not the be all and end all of education, and that education should be directed towards living experience. For me, a Druid education is an integrated one, based on developing a holistic intelligence, not just an intellectual one. And also it is about self-development and discovery and not for a student to conform their knowledge to a school’s syllabus. Another thing to remember is that education doesn’t just take place in a classroom, all aspects of our life educate us in different ways; from the media we get our information from, the books we read, the films we watch, the toys we have as children, the relationships we’re involved with, the careers we choose. All of these things are symbols of the educational and psychological structure we build up inside us.

 

Holistic intelligence I think of as something that includes many aspects of the human being. As I said, intelligence is measured mainly by intellect, as the so-called “Intelligence Quotient” or IQ reflects. It’s tests are all about how well the intellectual, thinking side, of humans work. The “I” of IQ is more appropriately seen as Intellect because intelligence can also be seen as emotional intelligence, physical intelligence, social intelligence, ethical intelligence and spiritual intelligence. We could also talk about creative or imaginative intelligence as Druids were also the artists, poets and musicians of their peoples, and also health intelligence, since Druids could also specialise in healing, as doctors of their time. But knowing how to be healthy and stay healthy is a fairly basic skill for all people, not just something for professionals. Education should be about the development of the whole human being, not just the intellect. In the same way that we should have a “healthy and balanced diet” to stay physically healthy, we should also have a healthy and balanced education, in order to develop a healthy intelligence, a holistic intelligence.

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“War does not determine who is right – only who is left.” Bertrand Russell

“A great war leaves the country with three armies – an army of cripples, an army of mourners, and an army of thieves.” German Proverb

“There is something ineluctably male about coalitional aggression – men bonding with men to engage in aggression against other men.” Rose McDermott

“Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.” Ernest Hemingway

“In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.” José Narosky

“To kill a man is not to defend a doctrine, but to kill a man.” Michael Servetus

There were so many quotes to choose from I could do nothing except leave this; http://www.quotegarden.com/war.html

This blog’s a bit more personal than some, but at the same time it’s all to do with a universal theme, something that many people can and do recognise. When I was a child, I played “war games” with friends, we’d pretend we were soldiers or fighter pilots and we’d be fighting against each other, running around the school playground, “shooting” each other. We thought it was “cool” and we sensationalise war, thinking it was “cool” and somehow “fun.” Another friend of mine didn’t want to play because he felt it was wrong, his granddad fought in World War II. I just thought “but it’s not real war,” and “my granddad was in the army too. So what?” Well, as I reveled in the “fun” of it all I told my granddad, something along the lines of, “You were in the army right? With tanks and guns and stuff. Wow, cool!”

My granddad was a stretcher bearer in WWII serving with the Gordon Highlanders. He was too old to take part in the fighting but young enough to go out to war and help in some way. This means he saw some of the worst parts of war, all of what comes after the killing. He saw dead people, dying people, insane people and other things that don’t need to be gone into, you can probably imagine. He even took a bit of shrapnel in his leg that he had embedded in him for the rest of his life. But I don’t know exactly what he saw, because he never spoke of his war experiences to anyone. No, not because it was so gobsmackingly “cool” and “fun”, very much the opposite! The psychological trauma of his experience made him shut up about it, as has happened with many others that have experiences war first hand. Unsurprisingly he didn’t want to relive the experience nor allow anyone else to be exposed to it.

But that didn’t help me much, at least not back then. I can’t imagine what was going through his head when an innocent little know-nothing-about-war boy, his own grandson, used words like “cool” and “fun” alongside war. And he didn’t even react! He sat in his chair silently not even able to bring himself to set me straight, just to talk to me and share a little bit of his wisdom. But now I’m older, and hopefully wiser, his silence has more of an impact on me than if he’d said anything. No pleasant reasoning, no angry shouting, not even an ashamed or mournful tear. His inability to speak speaks volumes that I can only understand now in my adulthood.

Recently I cried. I was watching a film that was showing some of the results of war. It showed inexperienced nurses being faced with all sorts of injuries, and one of them hid herself away to cry. It included old historical footage of soldiers waiting by a train, smiling at the camaraderie of it all, but completely ignorant about what will happen. Some of them just spotty boys that won’t even pull their trigger once before they’re shot. I imagined my granddad there with them, and I cried. His silent lesson really hit me then. I cried for him and the lesson of his hidden suffering behind his silence and for other people with less innocent experiences of war.

What I understand is that, when all is said and done, war is not about winners or losers, attack or defense, proud patriotic duty, little boys and their real or imagined toy guns, nor the sensationalisation of war and guns that is so prevalent in the media. At one end of the scale, if no one had fought the Nazi’s we’d be looking at a Nazi world. At the other, no matter how we may “justifiy” it or think it “necessary” war happens because all other options have failed. And here I must repeat Ernest Hemingway’s quote, “Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.”

Ultimately it’s about death and suffering. It’s about innocent youths getting killed before they’ve lived, it’s about never seeing friends and family ever again and it’s about seeing people so physically or psychologically damaged they’re never fully human again. Maybe if war was seen along these lines we’d try harder to find other, more creative, solutions to resolving conflictive situations, instead of sending soldeirs to kill or be killed. As Dorothy Thompson says about Peace; “Peace is not the absence of conflict but the presence of creative alternatives for responding to conflict — alternatives to passive or aggressive responses, alternatives to violence.”

I felt bad for what I’d said as a kid, but more importantly I have learnt better since then.